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Posts from the ‘Ciao Bello’ Category

The magic of Venice at Ciao Bello

venice best restaurant italy

Above: The famous Rialto Bridge on the Grand Canal in Venice.

A Night in Venice with Tony Vallone
Tuesday, April 28, 6:30 p.m.
Ciao Bello
$110 per person
not including tax & gratuity

PLEASE CALL 713-960-0333 TO RESERVE

Tony Vallone’s Regional Italian Cuisine Dinner series continues with “A Night in Venice,” featuring the cuisine and wines of Venice, home to one of Italy’s — and the world’s — grandest gastronomic traditions.

Anyone who’s ever spent an evening in Venice knows that it’s one of the most magical places on earth.

As night falls over the “city on the lagoon,” the din of water taxis and water buses wanes and the only sound to be heard is that of the gentle tide against the ancient banks of the canals.

Indeed, at the height of its power, the Republic of Venice was known as the serenissma, “the most serene.”

It’s just one of the reasons that the Venetian dining experience is so special. As you head from your hotel to your favorite restaurant, there is a “serenity” that you’ll find nowhere else on earth.

Tony is going to recreate a little bit of that magic for his “Evening in Venice” dinner next week.

We hope you can join us for what is surely to be a night to remember.

Image via llamnudds Flickr.

Venetian dinner April 28: registration is now open!

venice italy canal

A Night in Venice with Tony Vallone
Tuesday, April 28, 6:30 p.m.
Ciao Bello
$110 per person
not including tax & gratuity

PLEASE CALL 713-960-0333 TO RESERVE

Tony Vallone’s Regional Italian Cuisine Dinner series continues with “A Night in Venice,” featuring the cuisine and wines of Venice, home to one of Italy’s — and the world’s — grandest gastronomic traditions.

“Historically, the maritime republic of Venice was one of the world’s most important hubs for culture and for commerce,” says Tony. “And so it’s only natural that it would become one of the world’s most important centers for food and wine. Venice — with its maze of canals — isn’t just one of the world’s most beautiful cities. Thanks in part to its access to high quality seafood, it’s also one of the world’s most interesting food cities.”

The dinner event is part of Tony’s overwhelmingly popular series, which has included Naples, Milan, Tuscany, and Sicily, among other regions.

We highly recommend reserving early: These gatherings typically sell out quickly.

Please call 713-960-0333 to reserve.

A night in Venice with Tony Vallone: Tuesday, April 28 (registration is now open)

Tony Vallone’s Regional Italian Cuisine Dinner series continues with “A Night in Venice,” featuring the cuisine and wines of Venice, home to one of Italy’s — and the world’s — grandest gastronomic traditions.

“Historically, the maritime republic of Venice was one of the world’s most important hubs for culture and for commerce,” says Tony. “And so it’s only natural that it would become one of the world’s most important centers for food and wine. Venice — with its maze of canals — isn’t just one of the world’s most beautiful cities. Thanks in part to its access to high quality seafood, it’s also one of the world’s most interesting food cities.”

The dinner event is part of Tony’s overwhelmingly popular series, which has included Naples, Milan, Tuscany, and Sicily, among other regions.

We highly recommend reserving early: These gatherings typically sell out quickly. Please call 713-960-0333 to reserve. Registration details follow.

A Night in Venice with Tony Vallone
Tuesday, April 28, 6:30 p.m.
Ciao Bello
$110 per person
not including tax & gratuity

PLEASE CALL 713-960-0333 TO RESERVE

Alison Cook profiles Tony and 50 years of Tony’s

Click here for Houston Chronicle restaurant critic Alison Cook’s profile of Tony Vallone and 50 years at Tony’s.

“I commemorated Tony Vallone’s 50th anniversary,” wrote Houston Chronicle restaurant critic Alison Cook on her Twitter yesterday in her preview of her profile of Tony and 50 years at Tony’s.

“Here’s why he & his restaurant are legend.”

Alison and Tony sat down last week for a tête-à-tête interview last week at the restaurant and she recounts their conversation in this wonderful piece.

“Part of Vallone’s genius,” she writes, “was to make Houstonians feel that the world was at their feet at a time when the city was increasingly staking its claim on a national and international stage. Nothing was too much trouble, from the freshest Dover sole to hulking knobs of white truffle, or the glistening Beluga caviar that Baron Ricky di Portanova would, by special request, theatrically toss into a plate of pasta for his table mates.”

Please click here for the complete article.

And thank you, Houston, for making Tony’s the international culinary landmark that it is today.

As Tony says in the closing of Alison’s article, “You come to Tony’s to escape life.”

Menus updated…

Please call (713) 960-0333 to reserve.

Click here for our current menus.

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Mayor Parker proclaims April 1 “Tony Vallone Day”

Left: Donna and Tony Vallone.

It was fifty years ago today that Tony Vallone first opened the doors of his celebrated and critically acclaimed restaurant Tony’s on Sage in 1965.

To honor this momentous occasion, Mayor Annise Parker has proclaimed April 1 “Tony Vallone Day.”

The text of her proclamation follows.

For his own celebration of the anniversary, Tony is planning a gala event at the restaurant to benefit Memorial Hermann Life Flight on November 19, 2015.

We’ll be posting event details as soon as they become available. So please stay tuned.

And in the meantime, thank you for sharing Tony’s fifty years as one of America’s great gastronomic pioneers and one of Houston’s most beloved restaurateurs.

From the office of Mayor Annise Parker, Houston:

WHEREAS, Tony Vallone and his restaurant, Tony’s, have set a new standard for fine Italian dining in Houston ever since the restaurant opened in April 1965; and,

WHEREAS, Tony Vallone has been widely recognized — in Houston and beyond — as an American gastronomic pioneer who introduced authentic Italian cuisine to a generation of food lovers in Texas; and,

WHEREAS, today, as a culinary renaissance continues to expand across the country, Tony Vallone stands apart as a prince among foodies and an indefatigable champion of gastronomic innovation and creativity; and,

WHEREAS, on April 1, 2015, Tony’s will celebrate its 50th anniversary. The City of Houston commends and recognizes Tony’s for its exceptional service and extends best wishes for continued success.

THEREFORE, I, Annise D. Parker, Mayor of the City of Houston, hereby proclaim April 1, 2015, as Tony Vallone Day.

Ciao, the history of the word that is part of our name

From the department of “Just for Fun”…

Ciao… It’s a word that you hear nearly every day. Whether Italy, France, Germany, England, or the U.S.

It’s one of those words — a popular salutation — that has become a thread in the fabric of our lives. From teenagers to their grandparents, from celebrities to Joe the Plumber, from New York to Los Angeles and every neighborhood in between, even if you don’t use the word, you know what it means…

In English ciao is used exclusively as a salutation when saying good-bye.

In Italian, it’s used as both a greeting and a farewell. And when saying good-bye, Italians will often say it twice: ciao ciao

The word comes from sixteenth-century Venetian dialect, ciao from the Latin sclavus meaning slave.

It was commonly used at the court of Venice (at the height of the Most Serene Republic of Venice) to express respect as in the saying, “I am your humble servant.”

In English it’s commonly pronounced similarly to the word chow (/ˈtʃaʊ/).

In Italian, the oh in the (letter) o is more prominent (ˈtʃaːo).

The Venetians, who have a five- as opposed to seven-vowel system (like that in Italian), emphasize all the vowels: chee-ah-oh.

Such a small word but such a great legacy. All stretching back to a form of courtesy in Renaissance Venice.

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