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Posts from the ‘Ciao Bello’ Category

Free-flowing Super Tuscan wines next Wednesday at Ciao Bello…

best-itlalian-restaurant-houston

“As at all of my Regional Italian Cuisine Dinner Series events,” says Tony, “the wines will be free-flowing.”

Many Americans have traveled to Tuscany to experience the gorgeous landscape and earthy wines and foods of places like Chianti and Montalcino, where some of the world’s most iconic expressions of Italy’s indigenous Sangiovese grape are produced.

But few realize that Tuscany’s most celebrated wines — Super Tuscans, made with Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, and other international grape varieties — come from Maremma, the stunningly beautiful Tuscan coastline.

On Wednesday, October 5, Tony will be pouring a selection of wines from Maremma along with a menu inspired by the classic dishes from this unsung and undiscovered culinary destination.

We hope you will join us!

An Evening in Maremma
with Tony Vallone
Wednesday, October 5

7:00 p.m.
$95 per person
not including tax & gratuity

PLEASE CALL 713-9670-0333 TO RESERVE.

Tuscany beyond Chianti and Montalcino: A special dinner with Tony Oct. 5

“As at all of my Regional Italian Cuisine Dinner Series events,” says Tony, “the wines will be free-flowing.”

Many Americans have traveled to Tuscany to experience the gorgeous landscape and earthy wines and foods of places like Chianti and Montalcino, where some of the world’s most iconic expressions of Italy’s indigenous Sangiovese grape are produced.

But few realize that Tuscany’s most celebrated wines — Super Tuscans, made with Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, and other international grape varieties — come from Maremma, the stunningly beautiful Tuscan coastline.

On Wednesday, October 5, Tony will be pouring a selection of wines from Maremma along with a menu inspired by the classic dishes from this unsung and undiscovered culinary destination.

We hope you will join us!

An Evening in Maremma
with Tony Vallone
Wednesday, October 5

7:00 p.m.
$95 per person
not including tax & gratuity

PLEASE CALL 713-9670-0333 TO RESERVE.

It’s not authentic Italian cuisine unless you are using genuine Italian ingredients

best pizza recipe

When it comes to authentic Italian cuisine, ingredients are what make ALL the difference.

That’s why Tony Vallone selects his San Marzano tomatoes in Italy and has them shipped here especially for his restaurants.

That’s why he imports top Neapolitan “OO” flour for his pizza (above).

The same holds for his cold-pressed Sicilian extra-virgin olive oil, his Sicilian sea salt, and even the Italian bottled mineral water that he brings in to make his legendary signature pasta dishes (all made in-house).

Come taste REAL Italian food and REAL Italy at Ciao Bello!

Don’t miss the next event in Tony’s “Italian Regional Cuisine” dinner series!

An Evening in Maremma
with Tony Vallone
Wednesday, October 5

7:00 p.m.
$95 per person
not including tax & gratuity

PLEASE CALL 713-9670-0333 TO RESERVE.

“As at all of my Regional Italian Cuisine Dinner Series events,” says Tony, “the wines will be free-flowing.”

A Super Tuscan evening October 5 at Ciao Bello with Tony Vallone

merlot-italian

Grape harvest began this week in Maremma, Italy, where some of the world’s greatest red wines are grown and produced. Those are Merlot grapes that were harvest yesterday in the heart of Tuscan wine country along the sea.

In just a few weeks, Tony will be hosting an event at Ciao Bello celebrating the wines and foods of this extraordinary region along Tuscany’s coast line.

Want to find out more about Super Tuscans and pair them with classic Tuscan cuisine prepared by Tony himself?

Then please register and join us on October 5!

An Evening in Maremma
with Tony Vallone
Wednesday, October 5

7:00 p.m.
$95 per person
not including tax & gratuity

PLEASE CALL 713-9670-0333 TO RESERVE.

“As at all of my Regional Italian Cuisine Dinner Series events,” says Tony, “the wines will be free-flowing.”

Earthquake relief efforts: Amatriciana for Amatrice ($2 donated per every dish)

amatriciana

In response to the devastating 6.2 magnitude earthquake that occurred in Central Italy on Wednesday, August 24, 2016, Tony Vallone and the Vallone Family of Restaurants will be donating $2 to relief efforts for every dish of Amatriciana served at Ciao Bello and Tony’s through the month of September.

Named after one of the villages hardest hit by the earthquake, Amatrice (pronounced AH-mah-TREE-cheh), our traditional-style Amatriciana (ah-MAH-tree-CHEE’AH-nah) is made using guanciale, a classic cured meat (pig’s jowl) made in the mountains to the east of Rome where the earthquake occurred.

“Amatrice,” says Tony, “is one of my favorite places to visit. It’s famous for its black truffles and its salumi. It’s also one of the most beautiful places in Italy. It breaks my heart to know that it was destroyed in the earthquake.”

At the end of the September, monies collected for earthquake relief will be donated to the Italian Red Cross campaign for aid and recovery.

Here’s the link to donate to the Italian Red Cross directly.

On Wednesday, August 24, 2016 at 3:36 a.m. local time, a 6.2 magnitude earthquake struck Central Italy 10 kilometers southeast of Norcia (Umbria).

According to a report published by the New York Times, the first seismic activity was followed by “about 40 quakes over the next three hours, including a 5.5-magnitude temblor at 4:33 a.m.”

The greatest damage occurred in Rieti province in Latium, where hilltop towns Amatrice and Accumoli were devastated. Arquata del Tronto in Ascoli-Piceno province (Marches) was also hard hit.

According to a statement by the mayor of Amatrice, half of the town was destroyed and the historic center was completely wiped away (New York Times).

As of this posting, the earthquakes have claimed the lives of at more than 250 persons.

The death toll is expected to rise. The 2009 earthquake that occurred in Abruzzo took the lives of more than 300 persons.

What is a Super Tuscan? Find out on October 5 with Tony Vallone

maremma

Super Tuscan, a term often used to describe big, bold yet nuanced red wines from Italy.

But what does it mean and where did it come from?

The term Super Tuscan is used today to denote red wines from Tuscany that are made using international grape varieties like Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, and Syrah as opposed to the native Sangiovese grape.

Sangiovese isn’t excluded from the blend. And in some cases, even wines made using 100 percent Sangiovese grapes are also considered to be Super Tuscans.

The term came about in the late 80s when certain wines from the region were being classified as table wines — vino da tavola — even though they came with a hefty price tag (owed to the high quality of the wine).

No one really knows who coined the expression but all agree that it first appeared at that time when fine wines from Italy were really beginning to catch on in the U.S.

Want to find out more about Super Tuscans and taste some in good company?

Then please register for the event in our Regional Italian Cuisine Dinner Series:

An Evening in Maremma
with Tony Vallone
Wednesday, October 5

7:00 p.m.
$95 per person
not including tax & gratuity

PLEASE CALL 713-9670-0333 TO RESERVE.

“As at all of my Regional Italian Cuisine Dinner Series events,” says Tony, “the wines will be free-flowing.”

Super Tuscan Wine Dinner with Tony Vallone October 5

ciao maremma poster

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