Skip to content

The magic of Venice at Ciao Bello

venice best restaurant italy

Above: The famous Rialto Bridge on the Grand Canal in Venice.

A Night in Venice with Tony Vallone
Tuesday, April 28, 6:30 p.m.
Ciao Bello
$110 per person
not including tax & gratuity

PLEASE CALL 713-960-0333 TO RESERVE

Tony Vallone’s Regional Italian Cuisine Dinner series continues with “A Night in Venice,” featuring the cuisine and wines of Venice, home to one of Italy’s — and the world’s — grandest gastronomic traditions.

Anyone who’s ever spent an evening in Venice knows that it’s one of the most magical places on earth.

As night falls over the “city on the lagoon,” the din of water taxis and water buses wanes and the only sound to be heard is that of the gentle tide against the ancient banks of the canals.

Indeed, at the height of its power, the Republic of Venice was known as the serenissma, “the most serene.”

It’s just one of the reasons that the Venetian dining experience is so special. As you head from your hotel to your favorite restaurant, there is a “serenity” that you’ll find nowhere else on earth.

Tony is going to recreate a little bit of that magic for his “Evening in Venice” dinner next week.

We hope you can join us for what is surely to be a night to remember.

Image via llamnudds Flickr.

Venetian dinner April 28: registration is now open!

venice italy canal

A Night in Venice with Tony Vallone
Tuesday, April 28, 6:30 p.m.
Ciao Bello
$110 per person
not including tax & gratuity

PLEASE CALL 713-960-0333 TO RESERVE

Tony Vallone’s Regional Italian Cuisine Dinner series continues with “A Night in Venice,” featuring the cuisine and wines of Venice, home to one of Italy’s — and the world’s — grandest gastronomic traditions.

“Historically, the maritime republic of Venice was one of the world’s most important hubs for culture and for commerce,” says Tony. “And so it’s only natural that it would become one of the world’s most important centers for food and wine. Venice — with its maze of canals — isn’t just one of the world’s most beautiful cities. Thanks in part to its access to high quality seafood, it’s also one of the world’s most interesting food cities.”

The dinner event is part of Tony’s overwhelmingly popular series, which has included Naples, Milan, Tuscany, and Sicily, among other regions.

We highly recommend reserving early: These gatherings typically sell out quickly.

Please call 713-960-0333 to reserve.

Menus updated…

Please call (713) 960-0333 to reserve.

Click here for our current menus.

best pasta houston italian restaurant

Ciao, the history of the word that is part of our name

From the department of “Just for Fun”…

Ciao… It’s a word that you hear nearly every day. Whether Italy, France, Germany, England, or the U.S.

It’s one of those words — a popular salutation — that has become a thread in the fabric of our lives. From teenagers to their grandparents, from celebrities to Joe the Plumber, from New York to Los Angeles and every neighborhood in between, even if you don’t use the word, you know what it means…

In English ciao is used exclusively as a salutation when saying good-bye.

In Italian, it’s used as both a greeting and a farewell. And when saying good-bye, Italians will often say it twice: ciao ciao

The word comes from sixteenth-century Venetian dialect, ciao from the Latin sclavus meaning slave.

It was commonly used at the court of Venice (at the height of the Most Serene Republic of Venice) to express respect as in the saying, “I am your humble servant.”

In English it’s commonly pronounced similarly to the word chow (/ˈtʃaʊ/).

In Italian, the oh in the (letter) o is more prominent (ˈtʃaːo).

The Venetians, who have a five- as opposed to seven-vowel system (like that in Italian), emphasize all the vowels: chee-ah-oh.

Such a small word but such a great legacy. All stretching back to a form of courtesy in Renaissance Venice.

Ciao Bello, Tony Vallone’s “neighborhood Italian”

Voted “best Italian restaurant in Houston” by the Houston Press in 2013 and 2014…

tony vallone restaurant houston

At Ciao Bello, our menu celebrates Tony Vallone’s first passion: authentic Italian cuisine.

From our pastas — made with water and flour imported from Italy — to our Roman-style sottile pizza, Ciao Bello leads its guests on a journey through the Italian culinary landscape.

Tony calls it his “neighborhood Italian.”

Brunch? In Italy they call it “broonch”

CLICK HERE FOR THE CIAO BELLO SUNDAY BRUNCH MENU.

Please call (713) 960-0333 to reserve.

Above: The Kobe Burger with Fried Egg, Parmigiano Reggiano Fries, and Tomato Marmalade.

Italians love American pop culture: from Coca Cola to Michael Jackson, from Timberland boots to Woody Allen, they just can’t seem to get enough of it.

But in recent years, another all-American phenomenon has begun to command the attention — and appetites — of the Milanese and the Romans: brunch, or as the Italians call it, “broonch”.

It’s quite remarkable, really: in a country whose cuisine has conquered the world (can you imagine an American city or town without a pizzeria and an Italian restaurant?) and where food lovers generally hold American food in disdain (partly out of snobbery and partly because of the commercial forces that drive American fastfood), brunch has become an unstoppable fashion.
Read more

Menus updated…

Please click here for our newly updated menus!

Call 713-960-0333 to reserve.

best spaghetti tomato houston

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,336 other followers

%d bloggers like this: